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Today, I made a little headway in the train room. Last month I obtained 4 ea. 19"long pieces of Aluminum Glenn Snyder Standard Gauge Shelving from good friend Steve Eastman. Good friend and neighbor Bob Tomey milled the ends for that perfect fit, after cutting down to 16-3/4".

The manufacturer has been out of stock on Standard Gauge size for several months ,due to current Aluminum Shortages.
However, I was able to purchase Connecting Pins and End Caps. Pins were difficult, as they were much softer than originally thought, so it took some finesse going in and staying.
I have 3"long pins arriving Monday. These will go in at opposite corners with 100 lb Fishing Line tied between. This will prevent a 30lb Locomotive from taking a 7 ft dive to floor, should we have a Earthquake!

Joe Gozzo

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Two Cool Kühlwagen's

  Quite some time ago I purchased a KBN 8-wheel Kühlwagen. This car was made with and without the litho detail of a polar bear which appeared on the car door.    Other than the polar bear, the litho is relatively plain - the car name "Kühlwagen" on either side of the car door, reporting marks in the lower left hand corner, and an interesting border consisting of an orange and a blue line around the perimeter of the car side.

  Recently, I purchased a 4 wheel Kühlwagen made by Adolf Schuhmann. With the exception of the door litho treatment one's initial impression of the lithography is the two cars are identical

DSC_1200red

However, a closer inspection shows the lithography of the two cars to be different.

Let's start with the reporting marks.

DSC_1202

DSC_1201

The most obvious difference is the identification of home-München for Adolf Schuhmann and Augsburg for KBN.  The car numbers are, not surprisingly, different - 1520 and 27001. Both have the same black and white box with its geometric patterns.  The indistinct text above the box is close to identical "Rad", "Lade", "Trag", and "Gew.d W." but Adolf put more effort into making the numbers that followed the text legible.

  If we take a look at the car ends we can see the different locations for the manufacturer logos and we can also note the differences in the border outlines.

  Adolf Schuhmann has a border with an internal orange line and an external blue line whereas KBN has the reverse color combination.  When it comes to the corners of the border design we see Adolf Schuhmann chose to have the jagged design pointing out whereas the KBN design has the jagged portion pointing in.

DSC_1203red

  It's my understanding (Arne, correct me if I'm wrong) that the two cars were manufactured about the same time (mid to late 1930's).  At this late date, the similarities of litho style and color make me wonder if we aren't looking at an attempt to imitate, without exactly copying, what was determined to be a litho treatment popular with the buying public.  I find the similar but different litho treatment of the cars very interesting.

P.S.  I did a little rummaging around on the internet last night and it looks like, in addition to making their own designs for boxcars, Schuhmann made a number of cars that were close approximations to the litho style of the then current KBN cars so their Kühlwagen was not a one off lookalike. 

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Last edited by Robert S. Butler

Two Cool Kühlwagen's

  Quite some time ago I purchased a KBN 8-wheel Kühlwagen. This car was made with and without the litho detail of a polar bear which appeared on the car door.    Other than the polar bear, the litho is relatively plain - the car name "Kühlwagen" on either side of the car door, reporting marks in the lower left hand corner, and an interesting border consisting of an orange and a blue line around the perimeter of the car side.

  Recently, I purchased a 4 wheel Kühlwagen made by Adolf Schuhmann. With the exception of the door litho treatment one's initial impression of the lithography is the two cars are identical

DSC_1200red

However, a closer inspection shows the lithography of the two cars to be different.

Let's start with the reporting marks.

DSC_1202

DSC_1201

The most obvious difference is the identification of home-München for Adolf Schuhmann and Augsburg for KBN.  The car numbers are, not surprisingly, different - 1520 and 27001. Both have the same black and white box with its geometric patterns.  The indistinct text above the box is close to identical "Rad", "Lade", "Trag", and "Gew.d W." but Adolf put more effort into making the numbers that followed the text legible.

  If we take a look at the car ends we can see the different locations for the manufacturer logos and we can also note the differences in the border outlines.

  Adolf Schuhmann has a border with an internal orange line and an external blue line whereas KBN has the reverse color combination.  When it comes to the corners of the border design we see Adolf Schuhmann chose to have the jagged design pointing out whereas the KBN design has the jagged portion pointing in.

DSC_1203red

  It's my understanding (Arne, correct me if I'm wrong) that the two cars were manufactured about the same time (mid to late 1930's).  At this late date, the similarities of litho style and color make me wonder if we aren't looking at an attempt to imitate, without exactly copying, what was determined to be a litho treatment popular with the buying public.  I find the similar but different litho treatment of the cars very interesting.

If you look at the corners of the border lines, you will note a different design as well, both on the ends and on the sides.  The squiggly lines have differing designs.  The larger car has lines that go generally inward only, where the smaller car has lines that approximate a corner of the square/rectangle (lines go generally inward and outward forming an approximate square).

Interesting in how close the litho designs are, otherwise.

Back in June I mentioned my having recently acquired the earliest version of the Bing Kalkwagen which, when added to my other two gave me an interesting lineup of the evolution of that little car - first version - hand painted complete with lime (kalk) dust weathering and operating side door and top hatches.  The second car was also hand painted and hand weathered but the car sides were now just embossed to give the suggestion of a side door and there was a single operating roof hatch on one side.  The third car was all litho complete with lithoed weathering and had just a single operating roof hatch.

I posted this lineup

Bing_Kalkwagen_Over_Time

Recently I purchased a small group of Bing cars.  Included in the group was a Kalkwagen that looked to be nothing more than a slightly later version of the middle car.  The middle car couplers are circa 1908 whereas the car in the group had couplers circa 1912.  The painted finish looked to be a combination of hand and spray painting.  Since my main interest was in the other cars I didn't give the Kalkwagen too much thought.  However, that changed after it arrived.

New Arrival

Bing_Car_Kalkwagen_9686_0_1912red

When you put the two cars side-by-side it is easy to see the differences

Kalkwagen_1red

The overall painting of the new arrival is much smoother than the ca. 1908 car and the paint stippling to simulate lime dust has given way to a light over spray of paint.  However the big surprise is the treatment of the car roof hatches.

Kalkwagen_2red

As you can see both sides of the later car open and are hinged to a piece of wire which runs the length of the car and is soldered to either end.  So, instead of getting a duplicate of an existing car I wound up with an unexpected variation.

  By the way - it looks like a number of the German toy train manufacturers weathered their Kalkwagens.  I've found pictures of weathered Fandor cars and Adolf Schuhmann made sure his Kalkwagen lithography included lime dust.

Adolf_Schuhmann_Kalkwagenred

Adolf Schuhmann Kalkwagen

  If you go in search of pictures of real Kalkwagens it is easy to see why - even cars that appear to be otherwise new construction are thoroughly coated with dust.

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Greetings comrades!

Here is my York find (actually had arranged it in advance)...  Soviet set - wanted one for years and finally got it.  Mostly in VG to E condition, everything is there except for the instruction manual, the crate label, and a few of the individual boxes.  Transformer looks like new - it would be really cool to use it, but I'm not that brave (or stupid).  I briefly put the engine on the track, and it runs.

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My new old Ultra Rare variation LMAO backyard Chromed 265E showed up.  Was a little grungy but was able to give it a little rub with a rag and some Mothers Mag wheel polish and nothing more than a spray of tuner cleaner on E unit and it seems to run good.  It'll get a bit more cleaning but not bad so far.  I will run it with a set of Chrome 2613/4/5 Chrome cars with it and put the 618/619 with a correct 1935 Black 265E and 261TX.248078479_1753550224851253_3661639196765556280_n251790558_1753550171517925_399698620798477292_n253213207_1753550131517929_5419940767998947068_n255390359_1753550158184593_5723987744748052814_n255490508_1753550241517918_8689210419299580843_n256395944_1753550291517913_2090472703567192676_nchrome setchrome set-1Chrome set-3Chrome set-8Chrome set-9240560403_1707035399502736_8979360027364796636_n240562416_1707035379502738_5271825184950983704_n - Copyplated 2613

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I have no idea where it got plated.  IT has a restored Tinplate TCA sticker on it.  It's not perfect by any stretch. There are yellow shadows in a few areas, reccesses and corners etc.

Dennis,

  Very nice pick-up...The bigger issue is how do you possibly have room to run it with so many other locomotives, trains and all of your parts?

Tom

A tough to find all-original blue AFMCo. No. 4010 Wide Gauge tank car was added recently to the Flyer fleet. A sharp, correctly stamped OB was included in the acquisition. Also, a nice No. 4367 Shasta w/OB to pull my Wide Gauge freights was added. Except for being re-wheeled, it is all original and runs very well, including the reverse, headlights, and bell.

IMG_1262 [2)IMG_1264 [2)

Bob

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Last edited by Bob Bubeck

Today I bought a Lionel set #234.   It has an early 258 engine and a 257 tender, three passenger cars, etc.  I bought on a sales site not by the bay.  One inner box is missing.  That's the bad news.  The rest of the boxes are in good condition.  The outer box is amazing.  This set also included track, flags for the engine, and a #27 bulb still in it's box.  Check out the pictures.  I think this is a low mile set.

Bill

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I added a couple of 509 tenders to the collection recently.  Here are the 2 new ones

The above were added to the ones already in the collection

I am still missing 3 variations.

I also acquired a couple of 500 cars

Both of the above cars are unusual and are not listed in the Greenberg's guide to American Flyer O gauge book.  The bottom car closely matches a pictured car that has "Hummer" above the windows, instead of American Flyer.

The "Express" car also closely matches the Hummer variations, with the exception that it has "500" centered below the window, instead of the AFL with winged logo,

NWL

Increasing the Size of the American Flyer #97 Freight Station Platform

  I think the American Flyer #97 Freight Station is a good representation of the kinds of small freight stations that used to dot the American rural landscape.  You can set the station down on your layout and use it as produced but if you want to try to stage a scene of a busy station, complete with crates, dollies, and workers, the deck of the freight station platform is just too small.

  Since this was exactly my situation I decided the only thing to do was increase the size of the platform deck.  There were a couple of caveats - the modification could not in any way require changing the station itself and I wanted the platform and supporting structure to exactly match the American Flyer litho.

  The first thing I did was cut and shape pieces of cardboard to make the platform extension and its supports.  I cut the pieces of cardboard so they would just rest on the station base and match the height of the lithographed station platform.

  Then I took my station and propped it in a position perpendicular to my camera mount, taped a ruler to the supporting background and adjusted the station to get a picture of the lithographed wooden platform and the lithographed brick support which included the ruler.

DSC_1048

Platform_Wall

  I cropped these images and copied them to a word document.  I adjusted the picture until the inch marks in the picture matched the inch marks at the top of the word document page.

Freight_Floor

Then I printed the sheet and cut out the printed pictures of the brick sides and the wooden floor.

6_DSC_1053red

I used a glue stick to coat the back side of the printed paper and carefully applied the segments to the cardboard platform extension.

The finished product

7_DSC_9457red

...and the final result.



Station_and_Extended_Platform

    The biggest issue was getting the color of the printed wood to match the lithography.  I had to play around with hue and saturation in Photoshop before I found the right color print combination.  The reason for the differences in the printed platform deck and the litho in the picture is the angle of the lighting - as you can see the platform deck does match the deck color on the other side of the station..

   Since this was only for a temporary setup I used cardboard for the platform extension framing - If I was doing this for something like an extended display on a layout I would have made the platform framing out of .020 styrene.  The reason being cardboard with paper glued to one side tends to warp - you can manually straighten it (which is what I did for the project I was working on) but over time the warp will return.

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Last edited by Robert S. Butler

Increasing the Size of the American Flyer #97 Freight Station Platform

  I think the American Flyer #97 Freight Station is a good representation of the kinds of small freight stations that used to dot the American rural landscape.  You can set the station down on your layout and use it as produced but if you want to try to stage a scene of a busy station, complete with crates, dollies, and workers, the deck of the freight station platform is just too small.

  Since this was exactly my situation I decided the only thing to do was increase the size of the platform deck.  There were a couple of caveats - the modification could not in any way require changing the station itself and I wanted the platform and supporting structure to exactly match the American Flyer litho.

  The first thing I did was cut and shape pieces of cardboard to make the platform extension and its supports.  I cut the pieces of cardboard so they would just rest on the station base and match the height of the lithographed station platform.

  Then I took my station and propped it in a position perpendicular to my camera mount, taped a ruler to the supporting background and adjusted the station to get a picture of the lithographed wooden platform and the lithographed brick support which included the ruler.

DSC_1048

Platform_Wall

  I cropped these images and copied them to a word document.  I adjusted the picture until the inch marks in the picture matched the inch marks at the top of the word document page.

Freight_Floor

Then I printed the sheet and cut out the printed pictures of the brick sides and the wooden floor.

6_DSC_1053red

I used a glue stick to coat the back side of the printed paper and carefully applied the segments to the cardboard platform extension.

The finished product

7_DSC_9457red

...and the final result.



Station_and_Extended_Platform

    The biggest issue was getting the color of the printed wood to match the lithography.  I had to play around with hue and saturation in Photoshop before I found the right color print combination.  The reason for the differences in the printed platform deck and the litho in the picture is the angle of the lighting - as you can see the platform deck does match the deck color on the other side of the station..

   Since this was only for a temporary setup I used cardboard for the platform extension framing - If I was doing this for something like an extended display on a layout I would have made the platform framing out of .020 styrene.  The reason being cardboard with paper glued to one side tends to warp - you can manually straighten it (which is what I did for the project I was working on) but over time the warp will return.

Fantastic Robert!

Thanks for sharing your technique with the ruler too - it answered questions I had in my head for a long time but couldn't figure out

Nice Marescot John, they are not so easy to find in very good condition. Now here are the cars from Marescot you will have to find.... he made also a third class one, similar but with one more window.

78 IMG_741380 IMG_741681 IMG_741782 IMG_741983 IMG_7420

The name WERY under the baggage car is the name of the shop who sold them around 1928.

Very Best,  Daniel

Lovely RM coaches, Daniel - always admired Marescot for ensuring his coaches were as good in proportion as the locomotives. Not always the case ..

NMR

@eNeMaR 1928 posted:

Lovely RM coaches, Daniel - always admired Marescot for ensuring his coaches were as good in proportion as the locomotives. Not always the case ..

NMR

Thanks, they are very nice looking passenger cars for 1925 and still today.  in the same spirit the French manufacturer MUNIER has also made really nice ones, the size is similar to the Marescot models.

IMG_1688

Daniel

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I was anxiously anticipating the mail delivery today.  Two recent "buy-it-now" items arrived.

The first is this somewhat unusual American Flyer 3195 engine

At first glance, this looks like most other 3195 engines.  But there are a couple of unusual differences from most 3195 engines.

First, the engine has a 3195 plate on each side of the cab.  Most other engines have a 3195 plate on one side and an American Flyer plate on the other side.  The only exceptions to this rule that I have noted so far appears to be early 1930 engines, which do feature 3195 plates on both sides and the 3195X variation sold with Nation Wide Lines sets, as those engines have 3185 plates on both sides, see below:

Second, the engine has red drive wheels.  I have never observed red drive wheels on a late (1929 or after) American Flyer O gauge locomotive previously.  All of the 3195 engines I have observed have either black or orange wheels.  The wheels and the red color both appear to be original and there is no evidence of the red being painted over another color.

Third, the engine has gold trim along the catwalks.  The only engines I have observed with gold painted catwalks are the NWL 3185 engines.

The second item that arrived, came from the same seller, who indicated they had bought both the engine and tank car at the same estate sale, and apparently that is all the trains they got at the sale.  The tank has AFL and 3018 on each side and appears to date from 1930 only, based on the truck style.

Luckily I have a very nice tender, with cast iron coal load and no identification plates (similar to a tender with one of my 3185 NWL engines) and other cars in the series to go with the tank car.

In the coming weeks I will re-wheel the engine and will have to paint the new wheels red to match the original wheels.

NWL

Last edited by Nation Wide Lines

Being a mostly Gilbert American Flyer collector with a significant amount of Lionel AF production and a modest amount of S-Helper Service and American Models locomotives and rolling stock, I am not sure I should post my latest find in this topic.

My S Gauge stuff is all conventionally powered, have big AF compatible couplers, large flanged wheels and are run on “tinplate” track, and I do have some prewar AF and a small collection of Marx trains, so I hope this post is OK here.

Last month we ventured up to Tacoma, WA to visit my sister and her family and to see a concert with them.  I noticed that the Great Train Show as scheduled to be held a few miles south of Tacoma that same weekend.  The one scheduled for Portland, OR had been cancelled, and I hadn’t been to a train show or club meeting in nearly two years.  So my adult nephew and I decided to take it in.

The show had a bit fewer vendors than in the pre-COVID days, but those there were well stocked, the attendance was good while we were there, including some train club friends I had not seen in quite some time.  There were a number of operating layouts, and quite a few families with kids to enjoy them.

To bring this to the point, I had seen some good stuff at reasonable prices, but had not made a purchase when we decided to revisit some vendors on our way out.  I had seen this on David Danske’s table at very good price, and it was still there when we went back:

FA8349DF-9D50-41A3-8FE4-3924D4D81AE0F5D6A830-1120-493F-86C4-C39A8392DFD3

I had spent some time and money online during “lockdown” adding to my collection of AF and Gilbert tribute and anniversary cars, and this boxcar commemorating the S Gaugian magazine fit right into the collection.  I had subscribed the S Gaugian for over 40 years until it’s founder, editor and publisher, Don Heimburger, semi-retired and ended its production in 2019.  This car also immediately reminded me of a long ago Father’s Day when my then 5 year old son Chris, now 49, travelled five hours to Yakima, WA for a one day S gauge event put on by the Inland Empire S Gaugers.

We met Don at that long ago event, and Chris actually won the drawing for a subscription to his magazine.  Since I was already a subscriber, Don said he could add it to my subscription term.  After promising to get him something else in return, Chris agreed.  We also met Maury Romer, the keynote speaker and former key Gilbert AF executive, and had lunch with two S Gauge icons: Ernie Horr and Jess Bennett.

Now imagine my surprise and delight when I started to examine my purchase at home and found this on one side of the box:

E9746228-E04D-4E29-8F49-A9A32413F455

I can’t say who it is that Don Heimburger signed this for although Don Thompson was one of the founders of S-Helper Service that produced the car for him.

Regardless, for my first in-person toy train purchase in over two years, I think it’s pretty cool.

Cheers!

Alan








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A faux-tinplate station (using an original by Marklin as inspiration):

Made using cardboard, paper, acetate, basswood, a bicycle spoke, a shard of aluminum, a nut/bolt/washer, some carbon-steel guitar "string", and a few stanchions from the model ship parts bin.

A few things I wish I had done different, but it was a bit of an experiment from the start.

PD

Last edited by pd
@pd posted:

A faux-tinplate station (using an original by Marklin as inspiration):

...

Made using cardboard, paper, acetate, basswood, a bicycle spoke, a shard of aluminum, a nut/bolt/washer, some carbon-steel guitar "string", and a few stanchions from the model ship parts bin.

A few things I wish I had done different, but it was a bit of an experiment from the start.

PD

Excellent outcome, especially considering the low-tech materials that were used.  Do you have any work-in-progress pictures to share?

Also curious about the methods for painting and finishing.  The colors are convincing, and I especially like the scallop texture and shading on the roof and the block outlines on the base.

Last edited by Mallard4468

Unfortunately, I didn't take too many pictures along the way, but here are a few. I started off with USPS corrugated, cut to shape, built up in layers with window/door openings drawn in:

After cutting out the four sides and the openings, I used some embossers I bought at Michael's in the scrapbooking section. I carefully embossed stonework onto the corrugated, than gave each section a primer coat:

This was done with each side, than a two-tone paint scheme was provided using gloss spray-paint:

In a few spots you can see I pressed a bit too hard and poked through the top layer of paper on the corrugated. It added to the texture a bit, and in some places was covered by striping (automobile detailing tape) and/or signage. Window/door frames were cut from cardstock, painted, then cemented in. Signage was printed using Excel and the Inkjet printer:

The original Marklin station had no sidewalls in the "tunnel" bit, but I made a pair (seen at the top), including doors for a book-stall and a parcel office. For the book-stall, I scanned some lithography on an old Hornby station, printed it, than used it in the window. It's hard to see looking into the tunnel, but I'm hoping that it will be more visible when the internal lights are turned on.

I used a couple sheets of acetate to make window glazing, shot on one side with flat matte to give it a frosted appearance. This I cemented in using some Loctite GO2 cement, a personal favorite for many projects.

I went on to cut a couple of gable-ends to form the end bits for a lift-off roof using basswood for stringers. I then assembled the whole structure bit with basswood and Titebond at the corners and more corrugated at the center to keep everything square (and forming the ceiling of the tunnel bit in which I cut two holes for the internal light to shine through and illuminate it):

I made a couple of roof panels using some cereal box card-board and a piece of embossed paper purchased at Michael's that looked a bit like scalloped shingles (seen in the picture above lying on the paper cutter). The embossed paper had some sort of glitter applied to it...I lightly sanded this to remove as much as possible, than gave it a mottled paint job using gray paint, along with a dusting of the green and brown from the sides, all topped with an overspray of clear gloss.

For the platform roof, I made a rudimentary structure which I covered with one-sided corrugated I got from my good friend Howard Lamey. This stuff is brilliant, replicating the look of corrugated roofing perfectly. I gave that a shot of "steel" paint, washed it with some diluted black acrylic paint, a shot of clear gloss lacquer, than cemented the whole thing to the back of the station using more Titebond and a couple of straight pins for temporary fasteners.

The chimneys were fashioned from some matt-board cut to shape, covered with some hand-drawn brick paper, and tops made from a piece of matt board and a couple pieces of dowel (painted terracotta using some decent craft paint). They were each give a blast of clear-gloss spray lacquer (although it didn't dry with much luster).

That done, I moved on to the base/platform. This was cobbled together using scraps from the shop. I made it a bit too big, I think, but it worked:

I used 1/4-inch basswood to build up some steps, than gave the whole thing a coat of acrylic paint (Howard Hues "concrete", no. 1106). For the edges, I printed some gray stone paper on cardstock, gave it a dusting overspray of some light brown, than cut it to length and height and cemented it on. Once dry, I gave the whole thing an overspray of clear satin lacquer:

Stanchions were from my model ship bit box. I had some brass rod I was going to use for railing, but it seemed too malleable (little hands were going to have it all bent up), so I opted for an old favorite, carbon-steel guitar "string". No one's going to bend that, at least not easily. I glued the stanchions in with more GO2, than strung the wire railing. Base done, I moved on to making a little manual semaphore signal for the end of the platform.

The signal is made from a short length of dowel, a sliver of aluminum cut from an old foot-plate for a door, a bicycle spoke cut to length (with a 90-degree bend at the bottom), and a small bolt, nut, and washer to hold the whole thing together. Three holes were drilled in the dowel so that the semaphore could be positioned for stop, slow down for train orders, or proceed without stopping. The inspiration for this came from an old JEP signal I have seen. Here are some of the bits I used to make a mock-up:

I glued a wood bead on the top for a bit of ornamentation, painted the pole black and the semaphore a combination of gloss dark red and off-white. I then glued the signal in a pre-drilled hole at the end of the platform.

That's about it. Took freakin' forever, but it was a fun project for what I hope/pray is the tail-end of Covid:

This whole thing started off as an experiment to see if it was possible to replicate prewar embossed tin using cardboard. If you don't look too close, it works pretty well. Close examination, however, will reveal many flaws.

That said, it should be a nice addition to the clockwork layout planned for a Christmas display.

PD

Last edited by pd
@Mallard4468 posted:

Not sure what is meant by this.  The TCA restoration sticker is required when offering a restored item for sale at a TCA meet.  It does not indicate that the restoration was done by TCA or to any particular level of quality.

Since the 264E/265E was never offered chrome-plated, I guess I wouldn't consider it a "restore". Restoration, at least to me, implies returning something to its original condition. That said, Dennis' chrome-plated locomotive is really nice, and combined with the chrome articulated passenger cars, makes for a stunning set.

PD

Last edited by pd

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OGR Publishing, Inc., 1310 Eastside Centre Ct, Suite 6, Mountain Home, AR 72653
800-980-OGRR (6477)
www.ogaugerr.com

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